Doctor of Chiropractic

Parker’s advanced chiropractic curriculum leads to the Doctor of Chiropractic degree (DC), which covers fundamental and clinical sciences as well as jurisprudence, office procedures, and business management. Students are exposed to a selection of successful techniques that strengthen their versatility in the health and wellness field.

The course of study is a four-year academic program condensed to 10 trimesters. Many chiropractic students at Parker have previously attained a BS, BA, or higher degree prior to entering this professional program. Through their demonstrations of Parker’s high standards of academic and clinical excellence, our chiropractic students consistently go on to maintain successful, thriving practices.

Download Program PDF Fact Sheet

The Art of Chiropractic Technique

Within the chiropractic profession, there are hundreds of techniques in use for adjusting a patient. While each technique is unique and serves a specific purpose, Parker University College of Chiropractic has carefully selected the most common techniques in use today. As described below, the curriculum still provides students with the ability to customize their education by selecting techniques that are best suited for the type of practice they plan to open and the needs of the patient.

Upper Cervical Technique 
Upper cervical technique originated with the famous “toggle recoil” of chiropractic’s historical developer, B.J. Palmer. Because of the unique anatomy, biomechanics, and neurophysiology of this region, upper cervical chiropractic care focuses primarily on the correction of the atlas and the axis (C1 & C2).

Sacro Occipital Technique 

A technique which assesses the patient using a number of particular physical indicators to determine which of three primary categories the patient is presenting with. This in turn gives rise to a specific procedure for that category, along with further ancillary procedures to work with the patient’s skeletal, cranial, and neurological systems in order to restore a more optimum level of balance and function.

Applied Kinesiology Technique
Applied Kinesiology (AK) is a health care system based on the work of Dr. George Goodheart that evaluates the structural, chemical, and mental aspects of health using manual muscle testing combined with other standard methods of diagnosis. AK is a non-invasive system of evaluating body function that allows for the detection and correction of subluxations, fixations, pelvic categories, and cranial faults.

Flexion-Distraction Technique (Leander & Cox) 
This class introduces the student to two different flexion/distraction techniques: motorized as developed by Dr. Leander Eckard and manual as developed by Dr. James M. Cox. Motorized flexion-distraction table as developed by Dr. Eckard uses the concept of using motorized continuous passive motion to help find spinal fixations and then reduce the force necessary to correct vertebral subluxations through concurrent adjusting. There is also a special section on treatment of scoliosis.

Manual flexion-distraction as further developed and refined by Dr. Cox and based on the work of John V. McManis, D.O. This is a non-surgical technique for the treatment of (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) disc herniations, spondylolisthesis, and facet syndrome just to name a few. This technique has a long history, is well documented, and continues to be utilized in ongoing research.

Diversified II 
Advanced Diversified continues to build on the core basics of a dynamically based HV-LA technique and introduces those variables which are needed to address the differences between patient and doctor size. Issues discussed, demonstrated, and practiced are variables in patient position, table assistance and set up, doctor position, various contact points, segmental contact points, and indifferent hand contribution along with vector and force generator variables. The focus of this class is placed on the lab portion. Our goal is to further develop the adjusting skills of the student in order to prepare them for success in the clinics and practice.

Gonstead II 
The Advanced Gonstead course is an opportunity for students to further their skills in the Gonstead Full Spine Adjusting technique. The focus is on improving adjusting skills as well as diagnostic skills with the Nerv-o-scope and other procedures. Some variations on technique are presented, however the focus is primarily on improving the application of the techniques. The lecture includes case studies and case management from a Gonstead perspective. Line analysis on plane films and demonstrating a method for working with digital format films.

Activator II 
Activator II is Intermediate Activator Protocol for spine and pelvis, including extremities. Activator Technique was developed by Dr. W. C. Lee and Dr. A. W. Fuhr. The technique uses a system of analyzing body mechanics for diagnosis and utilizes a small, hand-held instrument called an “Activator” for delivering a precise adjustment to correct subluxations. This technique stresses the necessity of not only knowing when and where to adjust, but also when not to adjust.

Taping
Light Elastic Taping Technique is a course designed to teach the students how to use and apply light elastic tape to facilitate their current treatments of musculoskeletal conditions. The course includes lecture and practical workshops utilizing various taping techniques using a variety of different products.

Diversified Technique 
The most widely utilized, practiced, and researched treatment method in chiropractic is a high velocity – low amplitude technique usually referred to as “Diversified”. This course covers the diverseness of its background and represents the student’s first exposure to the primary entity that sets chiropractic apart and makes us unique from other healing arts. This course is divided into lecture and lab time. The greatest emphasis is placed on lab to learn the core skills necessary to begin to develop a truly individual and unique art form of adjusting. 

Gonstead Technique 
A full spine, specific technique using a particular protocol and very thorough chiropractic diagnostic procedures, including palpation, spinographs, instrumentation, and the use of individual Gonstead tables. 

Thompson Technique 
The Thompson technique relies on specific analysis and adjusting procedures throughout the protocol. This technique is a table-assisted technique for the full spine, using a drop-piece on the Thompson table to assist with the adjustment. While using the terminal point drop table, as developed by Dr. J. Clay Thompson, this technique employs specific diagnostic procedures, using leg length checks, patient positioning (prior to adjustment), and post adjustment leg checks to determine the proper application of the technique. 

Activator Technique 
Activator I is Basic Activator Protocol. It is a full-spine technique developed by Dr. W. C. Lee and Dr. A. W. Fuhr. The technique uses a system of analyzing body mechanics for diagnosis and utilizes a small, hand-held instrument called an “Activator” for delivering a precise adjustment to correct subluxations. This technique stresses the necessity of not only knowing when and where to adjust, but also when not to adjust.

Extra Spinal Analysis & Technique 
This course presents students with the fundamentals of detecting and correcting extra-spinal subluxations.

The following techniques are not used in the wellness clinics.

BEST
BEST is a non-forceful, energy-balancing, hands-on procedure used to help reestablish the full healing potential of the body. BEST principles acknowledge the concept that nerve interference caused by sub-conscious emotional memory override can cause imbalance in our autonomic nervous system leading to exhaustion of our organ systems over time with concomitant ill health.

CBP 
Chiropractic Biophysics (CBP) is a full spine and pelvis corrective/rehabilitative procedure having a firm foundation in the sciences of mechanics and physics. CBP Technique integrates Drop Table, Diversified, Toggle, Instrument-assisted Postural Mirror Image adjusting, Mirror Image Exercises, and Mirror Image Traction to restore normal spinal mechanics. Analytical procedures include visualization, postural analysis, and x-ray analysis.

NET
Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) is a physical stress reduction approach that can improve many chronic and unresponsive conditions. The course includes lecture and practical workshops utilizing a unique synthesis of muscle testing, Korzybski’s semantic responses, Freud’s repetition compulsion, emotion-neuropeptide theory, emotion/meridian correlations, reflex testing, and memory dynamics.


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The Parker Approach

Why choose Parker for your education?

  • A Chiropractic Experience 
    Dr. Parker’s guiding success principles continue to lead Parker University and serve as the foundation for future educational and professional progress. Internship opportunities, professional networking programs, and job placement assistance model our commitment to serve the needs of Parker University students throughout their college tenure and into their career.
  • A Foundation of Service
    Parker’s DC program demonstrates an unmatched commitment to the service principles at the heart of Dr. Parker’s legacy. We continually seek permanent and recurring resources to support scholarships for students while cultivating lasting service initiatives throughout our community. Parker will always work to unify others around the premise of service as the foundation of the chiropractic profession.
  • A Philosophical Focal Point
    Our DC program’s philosophy is rooted in the principles established by our founder, Dr. James W. Parker, whose vision continues to serve as the foundation of our university’s relationships with graduates, patients, and colleagues around the world. Our DC program’s attitude toward service can be exemplified by a principle established by Dr. Parker himself: Loving service is my first technique.
  • Overall Reputation 
    The atmosphere at Parker University’s DC program is a legacy first inspired by the world-renown Parker Seminars. Prominent and in-demand educators, speakers, and professional experts help create and cultivate the close-knit community of Parker University students and alumni. Students share a common bond with faculty, staff, and all those who collectively look forward to serving others.
  • Incorporation of Business and Management Principles
    Parker has long understood the necessity for a strong foundation in practice management. Graduates of our College of Chiropractic begin their career with not only a thorough knowledge of chiropractic and health care, but also how to build a successful and lasting practice.
  • Insistence on Evidence-Based Research
    Our faculty, students, and administration alike insist on evidence-based research to support the continued expansion of our profession and global health and wellness. This dedication is evident through our longstanding support for international research initiatives, funding of profession-wide collaborative efforts, and a commitment to generously sharing findings across the profession.
  • Internship and Professional Development Opportunities 
    Parker’s DC students have the advantage of participating in multiple internship and professional development opportunities. With free access to the legendary Parker Seminars and an advanced Continuing Education program, students are taught by in-demand and highly-regarded instructors. Our faculty works with students and outside organizations to facilitate community-based, VA, and clinical internships abroad and a multitude of practice-based clinical internships.

Why Parker’s Doctor of Chiropractic Program?

Parker University College of Chiropractic affords you the opportunity to enhance the best classroom education with valuable hands-on experience through a variety of internships. Foster a proactive approach to practice, dedication to the effort of excellence, and exposure to wide-ranging and far-reaching exploration into the exciting field of chiropractic care.

Parker University College of Chiropractic affords you the opportunity to enhance the best classroom education with valuable hands-on experience through a variety of internships. With selection to one of these programs, Parker students expand their knowledge and gain priceless practice hours before completing their education.

These experiences provide immediate reward to Parker students by fostering a proactive approach to practice, dedication to the effort of excellence, and exposure to wide-ranging and far-reaching exploration into the exciting field of chiropractic care.

Parker University Chiropractic Wellness Clinics
Parker students who desire to experience operations in a larger clinic setting are invited to apply for the Parker Chiropractic Wellness Clinics internships at two local, university-affiliated clinics in the cities of Dallas and Irving. These internships are excellent opportunities for student interns to receive hands-on training and gain practical educational experience from the demands of a wide and varied patient-base alongside Parker’s most-established doctors of chiropractic.

Veterans Affairs Hospital Rotation (VA Hospital)
va-hospital
The Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospital Rotation encompasses the clinical experience whereby interns have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to veterans experiencing a large variety of health challenges within a multidisciplinary, highly regulated, fully electronic environment. Interns are under the direction and supervision of a credentialed doctor in charge at the VA facility and participate in this rotation during the 10th trimester. In this course, interns will have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to a large volume and variety of patients in a multidisciplinary hospital setting. Interns will utilize all of the skills taught at Parker University in order to experience a wide range of patient presentations under the guidance and supervision of a credentialed extension faculty member of the university. These opportunities will allow interns the ability to expand their patient care knowledge and understanding by participating in supervised clinical experiences. Interns will complete their quantitative requirements in anticipation of graduation.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Rotation (CTCA)ctca-tulsa
The Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) rotation encompasses the clinical experience whereby interns have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to patients receiving specialized multidisciplinary care for cancer in a hospital setting. In addition, interns will also accompany the credentialed licensed practitioner to their private practice setting located near the hospital in order to provide chiropractic care to a large volume and variety of patients, while observing and learning successful practice management strategies. Interns are under the direction and supervision of the credentialed doctor with privileges at the CTCA facility. Interns will participate in this rotation during their 10th trimester.

Interns in the Cancer Treatment Centers of America rotation have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to patients in the process of receiving specialized multidisciplinary care for cancer in a hospital setting. In addition, interns accompany credentialed licensed practitioners in private practice settings in order to provide chiropractic care to the largest volume and variety of patients while observing and learning successful practice management strategies.

Interns in this program participate in this rotation during their 10th and final trimester, where they truly utilize all of their health and wellness experience through a wide range of approaches to patient care. This unique opportunity allows interns the ability to expand their patient care knowledge prior to developing their own practice or joining an existing practice upon graduation.

Carrick Brain Center RotationCarrick Brain Center Rotation

The Carrick Brain Center rotation is designed to improve clinical skills, develop clinical efficiency, and allow chiropractic students the opportunity to learn to manage a large volume of patients in a multidisciplinary brain rehabilitation center. Student interns should expect to encounter a wide array of neurologic, metabolic and musculoskeletal disorders over the course of the program. The rotation is intended for interns that are interested in pursuing functional neurology in their future practices.

The Carrick Brain Centers, based in Irving, Texas, combines evidence-based diagnostics with leading-edge technologies and treatments to help improve the quality of life of patients suffering from brain injuries due to either physical or emotional trauma, or degenerative conditions that affect the brain and central nervous system.

Practice-Based Internships Program (PBI)
The PBI rotation encompasses the clinical experience that takes place in off-campus facilities during the intern’s 10th trimester. In this course, interns have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to a large volume and variety of patients within solo or multi-provider practice environments while observing and learning successful practice management strategies. Interns will utilize all of the skills taught at Parker University in order to experience a wide range of patient presentations under the guidance and supervision of a credentialed extension faculty member of the university in a private practice setting. These opportunities will allow interns the ability to expand their patient care knowledge and understanding by participating in supervised clinical experiences. Interns will complete their quantitative requirements in anticipation of graduation.

Clinic Abroad Program – UNEVE
mexico_city
The Abroad Mexico experience encompasses the clinical experience in an abroad campus facility in Universidad Estatal del Valle de Ecatepec (UVEVE), Mexico under the direction and supervision of a credentialed doctor in charge of the facility at the University during the intern’s 10th trimester. In this course, interns have the opportunity to provide chiropractic care to a large volume and variety of patients in the non-medical multidisciplinary public clinic of UVEVE.

Parker’s abroad program has become the benchmark for all international internships at Parker and other chiropractic institutions by forging the way with a revolutionary abroad program in Mexico City; the first of its kind in Latin America. These clinics, positioned in the suburban area of Mexico City around UNEVE, our host campus, serve as a beacon of health and wellness in their local communities and provide Parker interns a wide diversity of case types, ensuring both strong educational and full enriching personal experiences.

Exposure to the local culture is an essential element to the abroad program – students are encouraged to explore their environment away from home, and are afforded ample time for adventure and discovery, allowing students enhanced encounters with life abroad. In addition to the clinical experience and immersion in other culture comes the opportunity and means to learn Spanish, a skill vital to many students as they establish diverse practices in the U.S. after graduation. Participating interns agree that UNEVE provided them with the clinical experience of a lifetime.

Clinic Camp
Clinic CampClinic camp weekend is a three-part experience consisting of physical, mental, and clinic practices designed to encourage mutual support for success. Physical activities include a ropes course, power pole, climbing tower, spider web, trust walk, and trust fall. Parker clinic camp attendees help each other tackle their challenges through teamwork, success principles, goal setting, mentoring, confronting fear, and communication.

The purpose of clinic camp is to prepare students for their clinical internship. It is an opportunity for students to participate in activities that require trust and embrace their personal growth. Even though each camp is a different experience, everyone gets out what they put in.


Within the chiropractic profession, there are hundreds of techniques in use for adjusting a patient. While each technique is unique and serves a specific purpose, Parker University College of Chiropractic has carefully selected the most common techniques in use today. As described below, the curriculum still provides students with the ability to customize their education by selecting techniques that are best suited for the type of practice they plan to open and the needs of the patient.

Required Techniques – All Students Learn

Diversified Technique
The most widely utilized, practiced, and researched treatment method in chiropractic is a high velocity, low amplitude technique typically referred to as “Diversified”. This course covers the diverseness of its background and represents the student’s first exposure to the primary entity that sets chiropractic apart and makes us unique from other healing arts. The greatest emphasis is placed on lab to learn the core skills necessary to begin to develop a truly individual and unique art form of adjusting.

Gonstead Technique
A full spine technique that utilizes a particular protocol and very thorough chiropractic diagnostic procedures, including palpation, spinographs, instrumentation, and the use of individual Gonstead tables.

Thompson Technique
The Thompson technique relies on specific analysis and adjusting procedures throughout the protocol. This technique is a table-assisted technique for the full spine, using a drop-piece on the Thompson table to assist with the adjustment. While using the terminal point drop table, as developed by Dr. J. Clay Thompson, this technique employs specific diagnostic procedures, using leg length checks, patient positioning, and post adjustment leg checks to determine the proper application of the technique.

Activator Technique
Activator I is Basic Activator Protocol. It is a full-spine technique developed by Dr. W. C. Lee and Dr. A. W. Fuhr. The technique uses a system of analyzing body mechanics for diagnosis and utilizes a small, hand-held instrument called an “Activator” for delivering a precise adjustment to correct subluxations.

Elective Techniques – All Students Choose a Minimum of Four (may choose more if desired)

Upper Cervical Technique
Upper cervical technique originated with the famous “toggle recoil” of chiropractic’s historical developer, B.J. Palmer. Because of the unique anatomy, biomechanics, and neurophysiology of this region, upper cervical chiropractic care focuses primarily on the correction of the atlas and the axis (C1 & C2).

Sacro Occipital Technique
A technique which assesses the patient using a number of particular physical indicators to determine which of three primary categories the patient is presenting with; this in turn gives rise to a specific procedure for that category, along with further ancillary procedures to work with the patient’s skeletal, cranial, and neurological systems in order to restore a more optimum level of balance and function.

Applied Kinesiology Technique
Applied Kinesiology (AK) is a health care system based on the work of Dr. George Goodheart that evaluates the structural, chemical, and mental aspects of health using manual muscle testing combined with other standard methods of diagnosis. AK is a non-invasive system of evaluating body function that allows for the detection and correction of subluxations, fixations, pelvic categories, and cranial faults.

Flexion-Distraction Technique (Leander & Cox)
This class introduces the student to two different flexion/distraction techniques: motorized, as developed by Dr. Leander Eckard and manual as developed by Dr. James M. Cox. There is also a special section on treatment of scoliosis. This is a non-surgical technique for the treatment of (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) disc herniations, spondylolisthesis, and facet syndrome just to name a few. This technique has a long history, is well documented, and continues to be utilized in ongoing research.

Diversified II
Advanced Diversified continues to build on the core basics of a dynamically based HV-LA technique and introduces those variables which are needed to address the differences between patient and doctor size. Issues discussed, demonstrated, and practiced are variables in patient position, table assistance and set up, doctor position, various contact points, segmental contact points, and indifferent hand contribution along with vector and force generator variables. The focus of this class is placed on the lab portion. Our goal is to further develop the adjusting skills of the student in order to prepare them for success in the clinics and practice.

Gonstead II
The Advanced Gonstead course is an opportunity for students to further their skills in the Gonstead Full Spine Adjusting technique. The focus is on improving adjusting skills as well as diagnostic skills with the Nerv-o-scope and other procedures. Some variations on technique are presented, however the focus is primarily on improving the application of the techniques. The lecture includes case studies and case management from a Gonstead perspective. Line analysis on plane films and demonstrating a method for working with digital format films.

Activator II
Activator II is Intermediate Activator Protocol for spine and pelvis, including extremities. Activator Technique was developed by Dr. W. C. Lee and Dr. A. W. Fuhr. The technique uses a system of analyzing body mechanics for diagnosis and utilizes a small, hand-held instrument called an “Activator” for delivering a precise adjustment to correct subluxations. This technique stresses the necessity of not only knowing when and where to adjust, but also when not to adjust.

Taping
Light Elastic Taping Technique is a course designed to teach the students how to use and apply light elastic tape to facilitate their current treatments of musculoskeletal conditions. The course includes lecture and practical workshops utilizing various taping techniques using a variety of different products.

Selective Techniques – Available to students interested in learning beyond the requirements

The following techniques are not used in the wellness clinics.
BEST
BEST is a non-forceful, energy-balancing, hands-on procedure used to help reestablish the full healing potential of the body. BEST principles acknowledge the concept that nerve interference caused by sub-conscious emotional memory override can cause imbalance in our autonomic nervous system leading to exhaustion of our organ systems over time with concomitant ill health.

CBP
Chiropractic Biophysics (CBP) is a full spine and pelvis corrective/rehabilitative procedure having a firm foundation in the sciences of mechanics and physics. CBP Technique integrates Drop Table, Diversified, Toggle, Instrument-assisted Postural Mirror Image adjusting, Mirror Image Exercises, and Mirror Image Traction to restore normal spinal mechanics. Analytical procedures include visualization, postural analysis, and x-ray analysis.

NET
Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) is a physical stress reduction approach that can improve many chronic and unresponsive conditions. The course includes lecture and practical workshops utilizing a unique synthesis of muscle testing, Korzybski’s semantic responses, Freud’s repetition compulsion, emotion-neuropeptide theory, emotion/meridian correlations, reflex testing, and memory dynamics.

Business principles are a key component of a Parker University education. Vital applications to business and creating a business plan are crucial facets taught in the first trimesters.

Practice marketing seminars and partnerships with doctors of chiropractic present realistic, practical methods for growth. Through After Hours Clinic Visit Program events and engaging assemblies, students earn tangible, real-life experience long before graduation, ensuring they are fully prepared for professional success.

Parker University College of Chiropractic offers all chiropractic students a variety of practice topics to help graduates succeed in their clinics through a focus on the following principles:

  • Consider and discuss the components of the global view of health care
  • Perform, document, and code for evaluation and management service
  • Perform and document a report of findings including a treatment plan, recommended care estimate, and informed consent
  • Document treatment records and a patient case outcome/discharge
  • Free access to the legendary Parker Seminars, where students are taught by in-demand and highly-regarded business instructors, ensuring sound business principles even after graduation

Successful Facets of a Chiropractic Practice Taught at Parker University

  • Prepare the foundation of a new chiropractic practice: career options, mission statement, types of patients
  • Calculate the financials for a new chiropractic practice: project costs, operating budget, break-even analysis
  • Determine new chiropractic practice location: Demographic study, lease negotiation, floor plan
  • Compare and understand billing models including those of the National Health Care Plan: in-network insurance, out-of-network insurance, cash, and combination
  • Understand practice performance statistics
  • Develop a patient acquisition plan (advertising calendar) for a new chiropractic practice


Admissions Requirements
Regular Path     COMPLETION OF 90 OR MORE CREDIT HOURS OF COLLEGE WITH A CUMULATIVE GPA OF 3.0 or greater.

Of those overall hours completed, the student must have earned a GPA of no lower than 2.0 in the coursework listed below:

Required Coursework Semester Credit Hours Quarter Credit Hours
English Language Skills 6 9
Psychology 3 4.5
Social Sciences or Humanities 15 22.5
Biological Sciences* 6 9
Chemistry* 12 18
Physics, Biomechanics, Kinesiology, Statistics and/or Exercise Physiology* 6 9
* at least half of these courses must have a substantive laboratory component.

Courses earned via Examination. Applications may earn a portion of the required pre-requisite courses through examination or means other than formal coursework, but only if credits are a) identified by an institution accredited by a nationally recognized agency and b) the institution has formally accepted or awarded such credits. Admission to the Doctor of Chiropractic educational program may be contingent upon receipt of such evidence by the Office of Admission.

Path 1.     Health Sciences Degree*

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree or above from an institution accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency that leads to licensure/registration in a health science with an earned cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 on a 4.0 scale, may be admitted to the Doctor of Chiropractic degree program.

Path 2.     Bachelor’s Degree with 12 hours of life/physical science*

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree or above from an institution accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency with an earned cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and have at least 12 credit hours of life/physical science.

Path 3.     Bachelor’s Degree with no science requirements*

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree or above from an institution accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency with an earned cumulative grade point average of at least 3.75 on a 4.0 scale without a science credit hour requirement.

Path 4.     90 or more college hours*

Students may enter in with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 scale with 90 semester units including a minimum of 12 credit hours in life/physical sciences.

*Students must complete the Chiropractic College Aptitude Test (CCAT). Students will be in a prescribed academic program designed to enhance the ability of each student in the program designed and monitored by the Alternative Admission Track Program Committee.

  1. Submit an online application: admissions application.
  2. It is the students’ responsibility to contact one of the following organizations to request that a foreign transcript review be prepared and mailed directly to Parker University, Registrar’s Office, 2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229. (This does not apply to Canadian students.) Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc., P.O. Box 92970, Milwaukee, WI 53202-0970. Phone: 414-289-3400. Web: www.ece.org or World Education Services, Inc., P.O. Box 745, Old Chelsea Station, New York, NY 10113-0745. Web: www.wes.org.
  3. Submit an original letter of support from a financial sponsor. Pledging to provide funding to pursue educational goals in the United States. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. Written on the financial sponsor’s personal or business stationary. Signed by the sponsor. You may sponsor yourself.
  4. Submit an original letter of financial ability. Documenting sponsor’s capability to financially support you (This is often called the “bank letter”.) Written and signed by an officer or official of your sponsor’s financial institution on the institution’s letterhead and bearing a current date. No photocopies or facsimiles accepted. Stating the financial sponsor has at least $38,630 available for the student’s financial support (this amount is subject to change – check with your international advisor before submitting).
  5. Submit the completed educational experience form. List all colleges and universities that you have attended.
  6. Submit a completed financial information form. List all expected financial aid that you are planning to use from your country or any other sources to finance your education at Parker. If dependents are accompanying the student, list them on the financial information form; otherwise, they will not be able to enter the United States.
  7. Submit all official transcripts: Submit to Parker University, Registrar’s Office, 2540 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX, 75229. It is the student’s responsibility to request that official transcripts be sent from all prior institutions where credits were earned. Official transcripts must be mailed directly to the Registrar’s Office at Parker University. A transcript stamped “Issued to Student” or hand-carried into the Registrar’s Office is not considered to be an official transcript.
  8. Provide course descriptions for all science prerequisite courses that were completed at a college or university outside the United States. Descriptions must detail lecture and lab contact hours. This is not applicable to Canadian students
  9. Submit official ETS/TOEFL or IELTS scores (Test of English as a Foreign Language) for students whose primary language is not English. Contact ETS/TOEFL at PO Box 6151, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6151, USA. Phone: 800.257.9547. Students must obtain these minimum scores: Paper-Based Test (PBT) – 550; Computer-Based Test (CBT) – 213; Internet-Based Test (IBT – Total score of 79 or above compromised of the following minimums: Reading: 21; Writing: 18; Speaking: 19; Listening: 21. The scores must be submitted directly to Parker University from the ETS/TOEFL office to be considered official. International students holding a bachelor’s degree wholly obtained in the United States can be waived from the TOEFL requirement at the discretion of the international student advisor. Contact IELTS at http://www.ielts.org/default.aspx. Students must obtain a minimum score of 8. The scores must be submitted directly to Parker University from the IELTS office to be considered official.
  10. Provide proof of health insurance.

*Policies applicable to foreign students only and do not apply to green card holders.

Persons with disabilities are eligible for admission, as long as they can carry out classroom, laboratory, and clinical assignments. Including microscopic work, X-ray interpretation and techniques, or the equivalent; pass written, oral, and practical examinations; and meet all of the requirements of the university. Parker University will make reasonable accommodations for disabilities. Applicants and students are welcome to discuss any disabilities that they believe will hinder completion of the curriculum. In considering a prospective or actual applicant who discloses a disability, Parker University may require an interview to determine if the individual meets the physical qualifications to complete the program. The coordinator of student assistance can provide more information regarding accommodations that Parker University might be able to provide.

Parker University has established physical qualifications for admission to the doctoral degree program. These minimum qualifications are essential to prepare and practice as a doctor of chiropractic. Students at the university must be able to perform at a high level of competency in all phases of the classroom, clinic, and laboratory activities because they will ultimately use this knowledge as doctors of chiropractic.

The physical qualifications are:

  • The student must possess sufficient coordination and use of both upper limbs to perform the chiropractic adjustment, the primary skill of the practicing doctor of chiropractic.
  • The student must possess manual dexterity to perform in the various clinical, chiropractic and basic science laboratories without posing a threat to themselves, patients, or fellow students.
  • The student must have the ability to stand to perform manipulations, adjustments, and other procedures.
  • The student must hear and see – appropriately assisted if needed – well enough to record patient histories, to provide routine safety instructions, to perform stethoscopic and other auscultatory examinations, to read all forms of diagnostic imaging, and to perform microscopy examinations to adequately interpret normal, abnormal, and pathological changes.
Doctor of Chiropractic Tuition & Fees
Tuition per Trimester, Academic Year 2014-15

Full-Time Student

Part-Time Student

Special Schedule Student

Tuition $10,575 per trimester $470 per credit hour $200 per credit hour

Tri I

Tri II

Tri III

Tri IV

Tri V

Tri VI

Tri VII

Tri VIII

Tri IX

Tri X

Activity Fee $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65
Parking Fee $25 $25 $25 $25 $25 $25 $25 $25 $25 $25
Technology Fee $125 $125 $125 $125 $125 $125 $125 $125 $125 $125
Lab Fees $140 $180 $200 $160 $20 $280 $240
Mal-practice $60 $60 $60
Insurance
Seminar Fee $315
Orientation Fee $180
Emergency Care $45
Manual
Clinic Camp Fee $325
Graduation Fee $200
Total $850 $395 $415 $375 $235 $495 $500 $600 $275 $475

Financial Aid is available for those who qualify.

The Proactive Approach to Health Care

When DD Palmer provided the first chiropractic adjustment in 1895, no one could have predicted the impact the chiropractic profession would have on the health and well-being of today’s patients. DD passed the responsibility of the profession to his son, BJ Palmer, who later passed the responsibility to our very own Dr. James W Parker. This rich history, coupled with passionate leadership, has built the profession into what it is today.

Traditional chiropractors focused on the art of an adjustment, designed to gently move a bone that might be causing pain or interference with the spinal column and surrounding nerves. Adjustments were used to not only eliminate the source of pain and discomfort, but to remove interference that might be minimizing the body’s ability to communicate to vital organs and other biological functions.

While still central to chiropractic treatment, today’s chiropractor incorporates adjustments into a treatment protocol that often includes advanced treatment options including nutritional counseling, natural supplement protocols, active and passive care, exercise and other therapies, low level laser therapies, and functional analysis for a variety of health care concerns. Unlike traditional medical approaches designed to treat symptoms, chiropractic is focused on treating the source of these symptoms. Chiropractors believe pain is the way our bodies communicate that something is wrong, and that we should proactively address the source of the pain, not mask the symptoms (typically through pain medications) without addressing the primary issue.

Professional and collegiate sports teams, pediatrics and geriatrics specialists, and medical doctors and hospital systems are now recognizing the benefits of chiropractic care and partnering for a fully integrative approach to patient health care. As health care continues to evolve, it is clear that today’s patient demands a proactive approach to health care and more and more patients are finding chiropractic is the answer.

wpengineDoctor of Chiropractic